Minors

Minors are an excellent option for students who want to expand their knowledge in an area related to their majors or simply to explore an area for which they have special interests. In addition, a minor can have a positive impact on the job search. A minor must carry a minimum of 18 credit hours, with one-third of those credits at the 300/400-level.

Courses required for minors may require a prerequisite. In those instances, students must fulfill the prerequisite and the course required to complete the minor in order to earn the minor.
 
Aging Services
Art History
Arts Management
Biology
Business
Communication Studies
Criminal Justice
Disability Services
Economics
Education
English
Entrepreneurship
Fashion Design
Fashion Merchandising
Forensic Photography
Health Care Management
History
Hospitality Management
Human Services
Interior Decorating
International Studies
Marketing
Mathematics
Multiplatform Journalism and Production
 
Philosophy
Photography
Pre-art Therapy
Pre-law
Psychology
Social Media Production
Sociology
Sport Studies
Studio Art
Theatre
Visual Communications
Women’s and Gender Studies
 



Minor in Aging Services
For more information contact Mary Handley.

The Aging Services minor provides an overview of the issues presented by, and the skills required to understand, our aging population. It addresses a student's interest in working with people who are aging or working within agencies servicing this population.

This minor requires several human services courses as well as an internship at an agency providing aging services. Internship possibilities include senior day centers, Meals on Wheels, the Office for the Aging, and Retired Senior Volunteer Program (RSVP).

HS 110 Intro to Human Services
HC 110 Intro to Health Care
HS 120 Intro to Gerontology
SB 361 Death, Dying and Bereavement
HS 300 Internship in Aging Services (One 6-credit internship or two 3-credit internships)
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Minor in Art History
For more information, contact Anita Welych.

The minor in Art History engages students from any major in an exploration of cultures and civilizations through an examination of humanity's most beautiful and meaningful creations. Although particularly recommended for students planning careers in museum studies, arts management, studio art, and/or art education, the minor provides much-needed depth and breadth to a student's general knowledge of art throughout history.

Through classes in art history, students interpret and better understand visual images in the historic and contemporary world. Art History is an easy minor to add, as several of the course options also fulfill general education requirements and are offered frequently. As students have a variety of choices, they can tailor the minor to their area of greatest interest.

FA 111 Art History I
FA 112 Art History II
FA 210 Art of the World
FA 401 Contemporary Developments in the Arts OR
FA 405 Arts in the Community

And two of the following, at least one of which must be at the 300/400-level:
FA 125 History and Contemporary Trends in Photography
FA 131 History of Architecture and Interiors I: Antiquity to the Renaissance
FA 132 History of Architecture and Interiors II: Baroque to the Present
FA 218 History of Fashion
FA 309 Special Topics in Art History
FA 311 Women in the Arts
FA 351 Museum as Medium
FA 401 Contemporary Developments in the Arts
FA 405 Arts in the Community
FA 408 Aesthetics
VC 321 History of Visual Communications
Students are encouraged to take at least one art or design studio course to round out their study in this area.
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Minor in Arts Management
For more information, contact Kathleen Allen or Anita Welych.

Careers in Arts Management are trending. Since Arts Management requires both hands-on experience in the arts and business expertise, the minor in Arts Management combines essential business skills with a deep understanding of arts organizations. Students completing the minor are well-prepared to enter the workforce in a wide range of creative industries, including art galleries, museums, theatre, musical groups, festival and concert venues, and/or one’s own business. While art and design majors may be particularly interested in this minor, anyone with an interest in an arts-related career will benefit.

Required Courses:
BU 215 Arts Management
FA 351 Museum as Medium
FA 405 Arts in the Community

One of the following:
BU 110 Principles of Management
BU 240 Principles of Marketing
BU 233 Human Resources Management

For students with a major within the Division of Art and Design or a minor in Art History, select two courses from the following (some courses may have pre-requisites):
AC 110 Fundamentals of Accounting
BU 110 Principles of Management
BU 240 Principles of Marketing
BU 212 Small Business Management
BU 233 Human Resource Management
BU 331 Organizational Behavior
BU 338 Problems in Management and Supervision
BU 363 Business Law
BU 431 Leadership
CM 231 Introduction to Journalism
CM 441 Media Management
FA 265 Theater Production
ID 425 Retail and Exhibition Design
SA 381 Internship (in an arts organization)
SB 201 Multicultural Contributions
VC 118 Digital Foundations
VC 174 Digital Page Layout
VC 375 Web Design I

For students with a major in Management, select two courses from the following:
FA 111 Art History I
FA 112 Art History II
FA 123 Introduction to Film Analysis
FA 125 History and Contemporary Trends in Photography
FA 131 History of Architecture and Interiors I: Antiquity to the Renaissance
FA 132 History of Architecture and Interiors II: Baroque to the Present
FA 161 Theater History: Prehistory to the Jacobean Period
FA 162 Theater History: Restoration to the Present
FA 210 Art of the World
FA 218 History of Fashion
FA 265 Theater Production
FA 311 Women in the Visual Arts
FA 325 Cinema Studies
FA 401 Contemporary Development in the Arts
CM 231 Introduction to Journalism
CM 441 Media Management
ID 425 Retail and Exhibition Design
SA 381 Internship (in an arts organization)
SB 201 Multicultural Contributions
VC 118 Digital Foundations
VC 174 Digital Page Layout
VC 221 History of Visual Communications
VC 375 Web Design I

For students with any major outside of the Division of Art and Design, Management or a minor in Art History: select two courses from either preceding menu.
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Minor in Biology
For more information, contact Thad Yorks.

The minor in Biology allows students to explore and strengthen their interests and skills in biology. Students wanting or needing a substantial background in the biological sciences without actually majoring in biology should consider this minor. Completion of two introductory-level biology courses for 8 credits ensures that students have a solid foundation of basic biological knowledge and skills, and 10 credits of 300/400 biology-related courses allow students to explore more advanced and specialized topics within biology.

The Biology minor is available to all students, except those majoring in Biology or Environmental Biology.

Two of the following four courses (8 credits):
SM 101H The Birds and the Bees
SM 101J Nature's Underworld
SM 101G Life In and On the Lake
SM 117 Diversity of Life
SM 118 Cellular and Molecular Biology
SM 215 Equine Anatomy and Physiology*
SM 224 General Zoology
SM 225 Plant Biology

And at least ten credits from upper-division biology-related courses (except SM 385 and SM 499), including, but not limited to the following:
SM 302 Wetlands Ecology
SM 306 Field Natural History
SM 307 Animal Behavior
SM 314 Field Botany
SM 315 Genetics and Evolution
SM 319 Aquatic Biology
SM 324 Advanced Zoology
SM 325 Plant Biology
SM 331 Animal Physiology
SM 342 Principles of Ecology
SM 343 BioTopics
SM 411 Cell Biology and Physiology
SM 470 Environmental Interpretation
*Equine Business Management students only
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Minor in Business
For more information, contact Joseph Adamo.

A minor in Business is a wise choice for students majoring in other disciplines. The Business minor provides students with an introduction to the various branches of business such as accounting, banking, human resources, marketing, and general management. This minor provides the added skills and knowledge that some employers may be looking for in new employees.

Required Courses:
AC 201 Financial Accounting
BU 110 Principles of Management
BU 240 Principles of Marketing
BU 363 Business Law
AND
One of the following (lower level):
AC 202 Managerial Accounting
BU 220 Business Communication
BU 145 Principles of Advertising
BU 205 Consumer Awareness
BU 212 Small Business Management
BU 213 Retail Management
BU 215 Arts Management
BU 241 Professional Selling
BU 281 Business Internship
SB 201 Multicultural Contributions
AND
One of the following (upper level):
BU 305 Money & Banking
BU 311 Supply Chain Management
BU 331 Organizational Behavior
BU 338 Problems in Supervision
BU 346 Purchasing Management
BU 351 A Comparative Look at Fortune 500 Companies (1 credit)
BU 352 Motion Picture Industry as a Business (1 credit)
BU 353 YouTube Phenomena and Its Impact on Business (1 credit)
BU 413 Entrepreneurship
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Minor in Communication Studies
For more information, contact Heather Maloney-Stassen.

The minor in Communication Studies strives to provide students with a broad base of knowledge in human and mediated communication. Specifically, courses examine the importance of communication in group settings, interpersonal (family, romantic, and friendship) relationships, mediated situations (social media, news media, entertainment media), and public spheres.

According to Bloomberg (2016), strong communication skills, both written and verbal, are among the top skills employers seek, but few candidates can demonstrate. Developing skills grounded in a strong theoretical foundation makes the Communication Studies minor a marketable complement to any major. The Communication Studies minor is available to all students, except those majoring in Communication Studies.

CM 110 Introduction to Human Communication
CM 210 Interpersonal Communication
CM 2__ Communication Elective
CM 302 Communication Concepts and Theory
CM 3_/4_ Communication Elective
CM 440 Advanced Topics in Communication
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Minor in Criminal Justice
For more information contact Benjamin Baughman.

The Criminal Justice minor is intended to give students a broad understanding of the criminal justice field, and to prepare students to work in positions that assist the field in accomplishing its mission. The minor is also designed to help students gain a strong understanding of their individual rights and an in-depth insight of current events as they relate to the criminal justice system. This minor is suitable for those interested in attending law school or working in the field of human services.

The Criminal Justice minor is available to all students, except those majoring in Criminal Justice and Homeland Security Studies.

Required Courses:
CJ 151 Introduction to Criminal Justice*
CJ 251 Corrections and Alternatives or CJ 152 Juvenile Delinquency
CJ 253 Criminal Law and Procedure
CJ 354 Policing in America
CJ 358 Ethical Issues in Criminal Justice and Homeland Security
CJ 341/SB 344 Criminology or 400-level Special Topic course in Criminal Justice

*This course is the prerequisite for the other courses in the minor, however if a student is beginning the minor in the spring semester, permission from the instructor will allow him or her entrance into any of the other courses for the minor. It will be required that the student take CJ 151 as soon as it becomes available in the fall.
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Minor in Disability Services
For more information, contact Mary Handley.
 
The Disability Services Minor provides an overview of the issues related to the field of disabilities including developmental, intellectual, physical and mental health disorders. It addresses a student’s interest in understanding disability issues, services, systems and culture.  The minor requires five courses in the disability area, and also an internship.  Internship possibilities include ARC, Liberty Resources, AccessCNY, Jowonio, Helio Health and the Cazenovia College Inclusion program. This minor is open to all students.

Required Courses:
HS 110 Intro to Human Services
HS 361 Therapeutic Recreation
SB 324 Childhood Disorders
HS 282, 283, 284 or 382, 383, 384 Internship (3 credits)(Program Director Approval)

Choice of two of the following:
HS 134 Introduction to Alcohol and Substance Abuse
HS 133 Community Mental Health
SB 265 Alcohol, Drugs and Modern Society
HS 240 Introduction to Counseling
HS 431 Rehabilitation Services 
LG 131 American Sign Language I
LG 132 American Sign Language II
ED 350 Strategies for Teaching Students with Mild to Moderate Disabilities
ID 232 Universal Design
CM 410 Advocacy and Public Communication
PS 323 Abnormal Psychology
SP 364 Sport in Society
 
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Minor in Economics
For more information, contact David Sheridan.

A total of five economics courses and one statistics course are required to complete the minor in Economics. These are distributed as two introductory level economics courses plus three 300 or higher level economics courses; at least three of these five courses must be completed at Cazenovia College. Upper level courses taken elsewhere would need to be approved by the Social Sciences Division representative to qualify for credit. All courses required for the minor must receive a grade of "C" or better.

Required Courses:
HG 131 Macroeconomics
HG 132 Microeconomics
HG 3/400 Economics course
HG 3/400 Economics course
HG 3/400 Economics course
SM 261 Statistics
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Minor in Education
For more information, contact co-directors Jessica Essary and David Rufo.

The Education minor gives students a solid understanding of the foundations of schooling in the United States and also provides students with field experience in P-6 schools. The Education minor is available to any student in the college who is not majoring in education (Inclusive Early Childhood Education, Inclusive Elementary Education), and does not prepare students for New York State teacher certification eligibility. The Education minor will be of interest to students who:

  • would like to pursue positions in public policy, educational research, and volunteer programs such as the Peace Corps;
  • choose teaching later in their college career and would like to prepare for admission to Master of Arts in Teaching programs or other graduate programs such as school psychology, occupational therapy, physical therapy, or speech therapy;
  • are interested in enrolling in a NYSED coaching or TA certification programs after graduation.
Students wishing to pursue a minor in Education must complete a minimum of 16 credit hours of education courses and at least two credits of field work with a minimum 30 hours in the field.

Required Courses:
  • ED 111 Child Development and Observation (3) and
  • ED 111L Child Development and Observation Fieldwork (1 credit, 15 hours)
  • ED 131 Teaching and Learning in Diverse Communities (3) and
  • ED 131L Teaching and Learning in Diverse Communities Fieldwork (1 credit, 15 hours)
  • ED 320 Emergent Literacy (3)
  • ED 090 Child Abuse/Neglect Identification and Reporting (0)
  • ED 093 Dignity for All Students Act (DASA) (0)
  • ED ___ Electives in Education (7)*

* Please note that 3 of these credits must be from an upper-level class (300 or 400 level)
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Minor in English
For more information, contact Grazyna Kozaczka.

EN 210 Approaches to Literature
EN 216 Shakespeare and His Rivals
EN __ Literature or Writing course (exclusive of EN 101 and EN 201)
EN 2/3__ Upper/Lower Division Literature
EN 3/4__ Upper Division Literature
EN 3/4__ Upper Division Literature or Writing course
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Minor in Entrepreneurship
For more information, contact Joe Adamo.

The minor in Entrepreneurship allows any student to explore his or her entrepreneurial spirit, which is characterized by innovation and risk-taking. Students get one step closer to making their dreams realities as they study the theories behind creating/growing a successful business. You'll learn how to build a persuasive business plan and obtain financial capital, while attempting to achieve your enterprising goals. This minor provides a strong foundation toward owning the business that you always desired.

AC 110 Fundamentals of Accounting or AC 201 Financial Accounting
BU 240 Principles of Marketing
BU 212 Small Business / Ownership
BU 363 Business Law
BU 413 Entrepreneurship
And one of the following:
BU 233 Human Resources Management
BU 205 Consumer Awareness
BU 338 Problems in Management and Supervision
BU 346 Purchasing Management
BU 431 Leadership
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Minor in Fashion Design
For more information, contact Elise Thayer.

The Fashion Design minor is a great choice for creative students interested in combining the technical aspects of fashion with their major program of study. This minor offers flexibility of course selection, depending upon student interests and goals. Students may focus on the construction and patternmaking aspects of fashion design or on the drawing and illustration skills required by fashion designers. This minor enhances students' trend awareness and creativity, and complements a variety of majors including Business, Communication Studies, English, Fashion Merchandising, Management, Photography, Psychology, Studio Art and Visual Communications.

Choice of three of the courses listed below (9 credits)
FD 110 Clothing Construction I
FD 113 Fashion Drawing
FD 131 Survey of the Global Apparel Industry
FD 213 Textiles

Choice of one of the courses listed below (3 credits)
FA 218 History of Fashion
FD 212 Draping Design
FD 221 Flat Pattern Design
FD 255 Digital Fashion Illustration
FD 322 Computerized Patternmaking (CAD)

Choice of 6 credits from the courses listed below:
FD 382 New York Fashion Tour
FM/FD 3_ Special Topic in Fashion/Elective
FD 3__ Independent Study
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Minor in Fashion Merchandising
For more information, contact Megan Lawson-Clark.

Students with an interest in fashion may minor in Fashion Merchandising to discover how fashion is planned, created, and promoted by manufacturers and retailers. This minor combines business and fashion courses with technical clothing, textiles and production knowledge to provide an overview of how fashion companies meet consumer needs. A Fashion Merchandising minor provides creative and technical fashion knowledge for students in a variety of majors including Business, Communication Studies, English, Fashion Design, Management, Photography, Psychology, Studio Art and Visual Communications.

BU 240 Principles of Marketing
FM 131 Survey of the Global Apparel Industry*
FM 213 Textiles*
FM 250 Fashion Merchandising
FM 365 Product Development Principles
And one of the following courses listed below:
BU 413 Entrepreneurship
BU 451 Fashion Buying and Planning
* Students enrolled in the Fashion Design program must take a BU or FM elective instead of FM 131 and FM 213.


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Minor in Forensic Photography
For more information, contact Sarah Cross.

Cazenovia College is proud to be one of the few schools that offers students a minor in Forensic Photography. Students enrolled in this minor get a well-balanced knowledge base for success in the field. Along with understanding the technical side of forensic photography, students also take courses in criminal justice and crime scene investigation so that they are aware of the processes and regulations for the use of forensic photography. Students majoring in Criminal Justice and Homeland Security Studies and Photography frequently take the Forensic Photography minor.

CJ 151 Introduction to Criminal Justice Functions and Processes
CJ 252 Crime Scene Investigation
SA 161 Photography I
SA 263 Digital Photography
SA 320 On Assignment: Location and Documentary Photography
SA 330* Principles of Forensic Photography
* May be offered or cross-listed as CJ 330 Principles of Forensic Photography
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Minor in Health Care Management
For more information, contact Joni Koegel.

The Health Care Management minor introduces students to a spectrum of health-related matters such as major issues in the health care profession, contemporary global health issues and changing societal conditions, understanding medical terminology, long-term health care issues, and legal issues associated with health care.

Upon completing the minor, students are prepared for entry-level jobs in the health care industry such as in a dentist office, government/military health care facility, health care consulting firm, home health care service, hospital, information technology/software company, insurance carrier, long-term care facility, managed care company, medical and diagnostic laboratory, medical device company, pharmaceutical sales, physician office, outpatient care center, or regulatory agency.

HC 110 Introduction to Health Care
HC 310 Legal Aspects of Health Care
HC 320 Long Term Health Care
HC 330 Current Trends in Health Care
HC 410 Health Care Planning

Choice of one of the courses listed below (3 credits)
AC 110 Introduction to Accounting
AC 201 Financial Accounting
BU 233 Human Resource Management
BU 281 Business Internship
HC 210 Medical Terminology
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Minor in History

For more information, contact John Robert Greene.

The History minor is designed for any student who wishes to expand their historical knowledge, not only of our own society but those of others, by becoming a researcher and an interpreter of historical facts. Students utilize a history minor to help focus their attention towards graduate schools in history or law school, as well as improve their preparation for graduate school in any of the allied disciplines in the liberal arts.

HG 101 World Civilization to 1550
HG 102 World Civilization 1550 to Present
HG 121 U.S. History to 1877
HG 122 U.S. History 1877 to Present
HG 375 Historical Research Methods (HU/SB 375 Methods of Inquiry may not substitute for this course.)Six credits in upper division history (HG) courses (300-400 level).
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Minor in Hospitality Management
For more information, contact Joni Koegel.
This minor provides leadership for students who may want a career in the exciting world of hospitality. Students are introduced to hotel management, casino operations, spa management, event planning, and club and recreation management. These unique courses gives students a broad understanding of how the field of hospitality operates in a business and management environment.

The minor helps students enter the field of hospitality and gives a unique look at how hotels, restaurants, casinos, and spas are managed in the dynamic realm of business.
 
Required Courses:
HP 119 Introduction to Hospitality Management (3)
HP 124 Travel & Tourism (3)
BU 203 Bed & Breakfast Management (3)
HP 316 Casino Management (3) OR
HP 314 Event Management (3) OR
AC 222 Hospitality Accounting
 
Select one lower level course:
BU 110 Principles of Management
BU 233 Human Resources Management
BU 281 Hospitality Internship
 
Select one upper level course:
BU 302 Hotel and Lodging Management
BU 402 Club and Resort Management
BU 403 Restaurant Management
HP 404 Cost Control
BU 481 Hospitality Internship
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Minor in Human Services
For more information, contact Mary Handley.

The Human Services minor introduces students to the helping profession. Students learn different perspectives regarding assisting those in need in our society. Students also have the opportunity to explore careers in the human services field. 

Required Courses:
HS 110 Introduction to Human Services
HS 240 Introduction to Counseling

Choose two:
HS 121 Children and Youth Services
HS 133 Community Mental Health
HS 134 Introduction to Alcohol and Substance Abuse

Choose two:
HS 331 Group Dynamics
HS 345 Counseling Families in Crisis
HS 361 Therapeutic Recreation
HS 431 Rehabilitation Services (requires permission of program director)
HS 475 Program Planning (requires permission of program director)
This minor is not open to Human Services majors.
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Minor in Interior Decorating
For more information, contact Grace Tallini.

Many people use the terms "interior design" and "interior decorating" interchangeably, but these professions differ in critical ways. Interior design is the art and science of understanding people's behavior to create functional spaces within a building. Decoration is the furnishing or adorning of a space with fashionable or beautiful things. The Interior Decorating minor assists students in further developing their skills in the specialized area of decorating, staging, and real estate development ("flipping"), all with predominantly residential applications.

Course content includes residential décor and materials application, color coordination, aesthetic adornment, and historical and current trends in residential markets. All those with an aesthetic or financial interest in the practice of decoration, and its impact on the residential real estate market, can benefit from the studies in the Interior Decorating minor.

Interior Design students must fulfill a minimum of 12 credits outside of the major to complete the minor in Interior Decorating. Nine (9) credits minimum must be completed at the 300-400 level.

Complete the following two required courses: (6 credits)
ID 225 Decorating
ID 361 Lives of the Designers

Complete two of the following courses: (6 credits)
FA 131 History of Architecture and Interiors I: Antiquity to the Renaissance
FA 132 History of Architecture and Interiors II: Baroque to the Present
ID 121 Rendering
ID 221 Residential Design
ID 242 Finishes & Materials
ID 243 Textiles for Interiors
ID 365 Lighting
SA 131 Design and Color Theory
SA 132 Structuring Human Space

Complete two of the following Upper Division 300/400 level courses, not already fulfilling ID 300/400 level credits within the major: (6 credits)
FA 408 Aesthetics: Philosophy of the Arts
ID 317 Kitchens, Baths & Built-Ins
ID 318 Furniture Design
ID 340 Event Planning & Design
ID 481 Internship (Residential or Décor focus)
ID 3XX Special Topics course as approved by the Interior Design Program Director
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Minor in International Studies
For more information, contact Jesse Harasta.

Students who minor in International Studies follow either the Generalist Track, the English Speaking Study Abroad Track, or the Modern Language Track. When internationally-focused special topics are offered, the program director may determine that they count towards the minor requirements. This minor is not open to International Studies students.

Generalist Track
HG 102 World Civilization since 1550
SB 230 Introduction to International Studies
SB 250 Cultural Geography
Three courses from among the following:
Special Topics (as approved by program director, maximum 9 credits)
HG 261 Comparative Political Ideologies
HG 310 Modern Latin America
HG 335 International Economics and Trade*
SB 301 Models of Society
SB 333 Human Rights and Genocide
SB 401 World Cultures and Societies
SB 385 Internship (must be internationally-focused and preapproved by program director) 3-6 credits
Any Cazenovia course with the OS prefix (transfer OS credits must be from an accredited institution and approved by the program director)
At least 6 credits must be earned at the 300/400 level.

English Speaking Study Abroad Track
SB 230 Introduction to International Studies OR SB 250 Cultural Geography
6 credits of core, international-themed courses while studying abroad
3 credit waiver for experiential learning
Two courses from among the following (at least 6 credits must be earned at the 300/400 level.):
Appropriate coursework while studying abroad
Special Topics (as approved by program director)
HG 102 World Civilization since 1550
HG 261 Comparative Political Ideologies
HG 310 Modern Latin America
HG 335 International Economics and Trade
SB 301 Models of Society
SB 333 Human Rights and Genocide
SB 380 Contemporary Slavery
SB 401 World Cultures and Societies

Modern Language Track
Until further notice, this track is only available to students of Japanese.
Student must choose a language of focus and all "LG", "OS" or elective coursework must relate to that area of focus.
SB 230 Introduction to International Studies OR SB 250 Cultural Geography
6 credits of LG courses in a foreign language in the area of focus
9 credits in any combination of:
Appropriate coursework while studying abroad in the area of focus OR
LG courses in the appropriate language OR
OS-prefix courses at Cazenovia College (or program director approved transfer credits from an accredited institution) in the appropriate regions OR
Thematically-appropriate electives in the appropriate region/culture/language (must be pre-approved by the program director)
At least 6 credits of study abroad, LG, OS, or elective must be at the 300/400 level.
*Program prerequisites required.
 
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Minor in Multiplatform Journalism and Production
For more information, contact Heather Maloney-Stassen.

The minor in Multiplatform Journalism and Production strives to provide students with a foundation in multiplatform media production and encourages critical consumption of media. Students take courses centered on production of news and media content for print, web, video, and radio. Students in the minor often take part in the campus newspaper, The Quad, and the campus radio station, WITC.

In advanced coursework, students learn how to manage projects, work with deadlines, and examine the state of the broadcast and news production fields. Students in the minor come from a variety of academic programs including English, Photography, Sport Management, and Visual Communications. The Multiplatform Journalism and Production minor is available to all students, except those majoring in Communication Studies.

CM 211 Introduction to Broadcasting
CM 231 Introduction to Journalism
CM 320 Communication in the Mass Media
CM 331 Feature Writing and Editing
CM 341 Intermediate Broadcast Production
CM 441 Media Management
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Minor in Marketing
For more information, contact Francine Varisco.

A Marketing minor allows students the opportunity to understand marketing concepts applicable to small business ownership and careers in advertising, art management, communications, English, equine management, fashion, psychology, public relations and social media, sales, sport management, and visual communication. A Marketing minor is easily added for most majors and can enhance a student's perspective on business.

Required Courses:
BU 205 Consumer Awareness
BU 240 Principles of Marketing
BU 348 Marketing Management

Choose one:
BU 105 Global Business
BU 145 Principles of Advertising
BU 241 Professional Selling
BU 213 Retail Management
Choose two:
BU 326 E-Commerce
BU 346 Purchasing Management
BU 413 Entrepreneurship
BU 3_/4_ Special Topic in Business
SP 253 Sport Event Management
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Minor in Mathematics
For More information contact John Livermore.

The minor in mathematics helps to prepare students for careers that require strong mathematical preparation. Students have the opportunity to study mathematics beyond the requirements for their major and they are provided the opportunity to explore advanced topics in mathematics.

The minor in mathematics is open to all Cazenovia College students. Students who wish to minor in mathematics are strongly encouraged to start the minor early in their academic careers due to the sequential nature of the course topics.

Students seeking a minor in Mathematics must complete a total of 18 credits.
 
Students may choose from the following catalog courses:
SM 161 College Algebra
SM 165 Pre-Calculus
SM 261 Statistics
SM 265 Calculus I
SM 266 Calculus II
 
Students must have at least six credits from upper-division mathematics courses including, but not limited to, the following: 
SM 303 Topics in Mathematics
SM 346 Linear Algebra
SM 361 Abstract Algebra
SM 366 Calculus III
SM 466 Differential Equations
 
Note: Students who enter the college prepared for calculus may need to take an additional upper-division course to meet the 18-credit requirement for the minor.
 
Note: Students may retake SM 303 Topics in Mathematics one time for credit as long as the topic has rotated.
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Minor in Philosophy
For more information, contact Michael Sanders.

The Philosophy minor is designed for students who wish to broaden their knowledge of philosophy with coursework that enhances their critical thinking and reasoning skills. The minor encourages interdisciplinary connections and critical thinking about the foundations of knowledge in many fields, and emphasizes courses in ethics and value theory (ethics, applied ethics, and philosophy of art).

Students of philosophy are known to be particularly successful on graduate school admissions tests such as the GMAT, GRE, and LSAT. The Philosophy minor is available to all students and is a beneficial complement to all majors.

Students seeking a minor in Philosophy must complete a total of 18 credits.

Required Courses:
HU 160 Introduction to Philosophy
HU 165 Critical Thinking
Choose three of the following:
HU 361 Commitment and Choice
HU 365 Ethics
HU 489 Independent Study: Directed Readings
FA 408 Aesthetics
Choose one of the following:
HU 301 Environmental Ethics
HU 461 Values in the Modern World
HU 465 Ethical Issues in Organizations
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Minor in Photography
For more information, contact Sarah Cross.

Students with a minor in Photography are exposed to a wide range of photographic practices including digital photography, black and white film photography and studio lighting. The upper level courses give students the opportunity to pursue a specific area of study including but not limited to: sports photography, studio photography, documentary photography, fine art photography and fashion photography. Students who major in Communication Studies, Fashion Design, Studio Art and Visual Communications often take the Photography minor.

SA 161 Photography I
SA 162 Black & White Film Photography
SA 270 Studio Photography
SA 276 Computer Imaging or SA 263 Digital Photography*
* Students in the Visual Communication program may substitute VC 274 Imaging Graphics.

Choose at least two courses from the following list of options:
SA 309 Special Topics in the Arts (Photo related subject)
SA 320 On Assignment: Location and Documentary Photography
SA 325 Large Format Photography and Fine Printing
SA 330 Forensic Photography
SA 365 Alternative Processes
SA 410 Professional Photography Practices
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Minor in Pre-Art Therapy
For more information, contact Rachel Dinero or Karen Steen.

According to the American Art Therapy Association, art therapy is a mental health profession that utilizes the making of art as a treatment and diagnostic tool. Art therapists assist clients in healing, exploring feelings, managing behavior, working through abusive situations, and fostering self-awareness. Art therapists work with all age groups and are needed in settings as diverse as hospitals, psychiatric and rehabilitation facilities, schools, family services, senior centers, private practice, and other clinical and community settings.  While a master’s degree at an accredited university and licensure are required to practice art therapy, a certain level of preparation is required at the undergraduate level.
 
The Pre-Art Therapy minor prepares students for entry into graduate programs in Art Therapy. This minor follows the guidelines of the American Art Therapy Association and the National Association of Schools of Art and Design. Upon completion, students are qualified to apply to graduate school (consult the American Art Therapy Association Web site for a list of accredited graduate schools). Most graduate school programs prepare students for licensure as both registered and credentialed art therapists and licensed professional counselors, providing greater professional flexibility.

The following courses in Psychology and Human Services are required:
PS 120 Intro to Psychology
HS 240 Intro to Counseling
HS 361 Therapeutic Recreation
PS 225 Lifespan Developmental Psychology
PS 323 Abnormal Psychology
PS 326 Theories of Personality

In order to complete the minor in Pre-Art Therapy, students will need to be Studio Art/Photography majors or have 18 studio art credits by the time they graduate. Recommended courses include:
SA 111 Drawing I
SA 121 Painting
SA 131 Design and Color Theory
SA 132 Structuring Human Space
SA 161 Photography I
SA 168 Time, Movement, Narrative
SA 241 Ceramics
SA 242 Sculpture
SA 320 On Assignment: Location and Documentary Photography
SA 393 Internship Preparation
SA 381 Internship
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Minor in Pre-Law
For more information, contact John Robert Greene.

The interdisciplinary Pre-Law minor complements a student's major with coursework that helps prepare the student for the demands of law school. It is also designed to strengthen skills in areas needed for success in law school. Students will also have opportunities to work with the Career Services Office to prepare for the LSAT.

Required Courses:
HG 141 Government and Politics of the United States
HU 165 Critical Thinking and Logic

Area I: Law (one course from the following)
BU 363 Business Law
BU 368 Sport Law
CJ 253 Criminal Law and Procedure
CJ/HG 357 Constitutional Law
HG 101C First Year Seminar: The First Amendment
HG 358 International Law
HG ___ ST: American Legal History

Area II: Written and Spoken Communications (one course from the following)
CM 313 Debate
CM 410 Advocacy and Public Policy
CM 420 Persuasion
EN 312 Advanced Composition

Area III: Economics/Accounting/Statistics (one course from the following)
AC 201 Principles of Accounting
AC 202 Managerial Accounting
HG 131 Macroeconomics
HG 132 Microeconomics
SM 261 Statistics

Area IV: Social Sciences (one course from the following)
CJ 251 Corrections and Alternatives
CJ 351 Criminal Justice Process
HG 121 U.S. History to 1877
HG 122 U.S. History 1877 to Present
SB 231 Social Problems
SB 321 Psychology Applied to Interpersonal Behavior
SB 336 Social Welfare Policies
SB 344/CJ 341 Criminology

It is recommended that students take more courses in each of the areas if their degree requirements allow it.

When legal studies-focused special topic courses are offered, the program director may determine that they count toward the minor requirements.
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Minor in Psychology
For more information, contact Rachel Dinero.

The Psychology minor is designed to provide students with a broad overview of the field of psychology. This minor will help students gain a stronger understanding of human thoughts and behavior. This minor is an excellent addition to any major, particularly for students who wish to gain scientific insight into the human mind.

PS 120 Introduction to Psychology

At least one course from each of the following three areas:
Biological/Cognitive
PS 327 Biopsychology
PS 330 Sensation and Perception
PS 341 Learning
PS 364 Cognition

Social/Developmental
PS 1__ Child, Adolescent, or Adult Psychology
PS 225 Lifespan Developmental Psychology
PS 234 Social Psychology

Clinical/Applied
PS 323 Abnormal Psychology
PS 325 Educational Psychology
PS 326 Theories of Personality

Plus the student’s choice of two additional psychology courses.
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Minor in Social Media Production
For more information, contact Heather Maloney-Stassen.

Students earning a social media minor will learn how to utilize social media to attract and communicate with customers, clients, and consumers. They will learn how to develop marketing and branding strategies in corporate, non-profit, advocacy, entertainment, and news sectors using a variety of social media techniques and platforms. The minor in Social Media is open to all majors.
 
Required Courses:
CM 110 – Introduction to Human Communication
VC 118 – Digital Foundations
SA 161 – Photography 1
 
Select three courses (two must be at the 300/400 level, only one may be in your major):
BU 240 – Principles of Marketing*
BU 385 - Social Media Marketing
CM 211 – Introduction to Broadcasting
CM 410 – Advocacy and Public Communication
CM 320 – Communication in the Mass Media
CM 430 – Organizational Communication
SA 168 – Time, Movement, Narrative
SA 320 – Location and Documentary Photography (prerequisites will be waived for those in the social media minor)
VC 235 – Commercial Film & Video Production
VC 303 – Protest and Propaganda
VC 374 – Interactive Graphics (prerequisites will be waived for those in the social media minor)
VC 313 – Mobile App Design (prerequisites will be waived for those in the social media minor)
VC 375 – Web Design I (prerequisites will be waived for those in the social media minor)
 
TOTAL CREDITS - 18 credits, at least 1/3 at the 300-400 level
 
*Students interested in the marketing component of social media are strongly encouraged to take BU 240.
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Minor in Sociology
For more information, contact Jesse Harasta.

The Sociology minor allows students to study a diverse group of topics from social inequalities to issues regarding families, education, politics, the economy and religion. Students are able to explore courses relevant to their interests. Courses are also offered that investigate American society’s role within a greater global context. Upon completion of the minor, students are able to critically analyze contemporary social problems from a theoretical and practical level.

The minor requires a minimum of 18 credits including Introduction to Sociology, Social Problems, and Social Theory. Students are able to choose a set of courses based on their major or interests.

SB 130 Introduction to Sociology.
SB 231 Social Problems
SB 430 Social Theory
SB 2/3__ Sociology Elective
SB 3/4__ Sociology Elective
SB 3/4__ Sociology Elective
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Minor in Sport Studies
For more information contact Tracy Trachsler.

In an effort to offer students in other academic disciplines the opportunity to explore the concepts involved with the sport industry, the following is proposed as a way for students to minor in Sport Studies. This minor will accommodate students in any baccalaureate program. The total credit requirement for a minor in Sport Studies is 18 credits.

Required (12 credits)
SP 118 - Introduction to Sport Management
SP 323 - Sport Marketing, Promotion, and Sales
SP 364 - Sport in Society
SP 455 - Financing Sport Operations

Required - Select One (3 credits)
SP 230 - Sport Arena and Facility Management
SP 353 - Sport Event Management

Required - Select One (3 credits)

SP 269 - Current Issues in Sport
SP 488 - Sport Internship
SP 335 - Leadership Through Coaching
SP 100-400 - Any sport elective
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Minor in Studio Art
For more information, contact Jen Pepper.
Art teaches us to see, feel, and understand in ways that no other discipline can. The minor in Studio Art gives students an opportunity to develop their creativity, their problem-solving skills and their technical skills in a wide variety of media. Students begin with courses that develop basic skills, then move on to advanced work in areas of their choice: ceramics, painting, drawing, kiln-formed glass, sculpture, printmaking, small metals/jewelry, figure drawing, installation or book arts. Students in any major can derive joy and maximize their creative potential by pursuing the hands-on Studio Art minor, and may be especially helpful for those pursuing education, art therapy, arts management or liberal studies.

Required Course:
FA 401 Contemporary Development in the Arts

Choose two courses from the following list:
SA 111 Drawing: Composition and Perception
SA 131 Design and Color Theory
SA 132 Structuring Human Space
SA 168 Time, Movement and Narrative

Choose one of the following courses:
SA 361 Site and Space
SA 302 Graphic Forms

Choose any two 200-400 level SA courses:
SA 214 Figure Drawing (or SA 314 Intermediate Figure Drawing or SA 414 Advanced Figure Drawing)
SA 231 Printmaking (or SA 331 Intermediate Printmaking or SA 431 Advanced Printmaking)
SA 241 Ceramics (or SA 341 Intermediate Ceramics or SA 441 Advanced Ceramics)
SA 242 Sculpture: Glass/Mixed Media (or SA 342 Intermediate Sculpture: Glass/Mixed Media or SA 442 Advanced Sculpture: Glass/Mixed Media)
SA 307 Intermediate Graphic Forms (or SA 407 Advanced Graphic Forms)
SA 308 Small Metals/Jewelry (or SA 317 Intermediate Small Metals/Jewelry or SA 417 Advanced Small Metals/Jewelry)
SA 311 Life Drawing and 3D Forms (or SA 416 Advanced Life Drawing & 3-D Forms)
SA 321 Intermediate Painting (or SA 421 Advanced Painting)
SA 415 Graphic Forms
SA 378 Intermediate Site and Space (or SA 478 Advanced Site and Space)
SA 309 Special Topics in the Arts, by approval of the Program Director

Courses must have primarily Studio Art related content.  Students in Studio Art: Photography must take an additional 200-400 level SA course from the list.  this minor is not open to majors in the Studio Art: Studio Art concentration.
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Minor in Theatre
For more information, contact Roxana Spano.

The Theatre minor offers students the opportunity to complement a variety of majors with skills and knowledge that facilitate self-expression and preparedness for a myriad of diverse careers. The varied course selection provides a sound foundation in theater history and textual analysis as well as the ability to customize the minor to reflect student preferences for either performance or production (or a combination of both). A popular minor for English majors, the Theatre minor also appeals to students majoring in Communication Studies, Fashion Design (costume design), Psychology (drama therapy), and Studio Art (set design and lighting).

Six courses selected from below, to include at least two 300/400-level courses.
FA 161 Theatre History: Prehistory to the Jacobean Period
FA 162 Theatre History: Restoration to the Present
FA 165 Acting Workshop
FA 265 Theatre Production (may be taken twice for credit)
FA 366 Advanced Acting Workshop
FA 373 Research in the Performing Arts I
FA 385 Fine Arts Internship I
FA 473 Research in the Performing Arts II
FA 485 Fine Arts Internship II
EN 216 Shakespeare and His Rivals
EN 3/4 Special Topic in Dramatic Literature
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Minor in Visual Communications
For more information, contact Laurie Selleck.

A minor in Visual Communications supplements a wide variety of majors, especially Business Management, Communication Studies, Fashion Studies, Interior Design, Photography, and Studio Art. The minor provides marketable skills and professional advantages by offering students a broad introduction to the tools, skills, principles, and formats used to develop and present creative ideas.

Students may select to focus their courses in one field of choice such as graphic design, illustration, advertising, or web design or they may choose to study in all of these areas and more. Students will gain in-depth experience using industry-standard software and become more viable in today's competitive job market.

Required Courses:
VC 140 Typography
VC 118 Digital Foundations or VC 174 Digital Page Layout
VC 242 Graphic Design I

Choose at least three courses from the following list. Two courses must be at the 300 level or higher.
VC 118 Digital Foundations or VC 174 Digital Page Layout
VC 232 Illustration I
VC 241 Advertising Design I
VC 274 Imaging Graphics
VC 388 Package Design
VC 341 Advertising Design II
VC 342 Graphic Design II
VC 374 Interactive Design
VC 375 Web Design I
VC 475 Web Design II

*Pre-requisites may be required for any of the courses above and must be fulfilled before enrolling in the course of your choosing.
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Minor in Women’s and Gender Studies
For more information, contact Grazyna Kozaczka.
The Women’s and Gender Studies Minor is open to all students at the college. This interdisciplinary minor is flexible and pairs well with many majors. The Women’s and Gender Studies minor encourages empathy, empowerment, and advocacy. Through close examination of women and gender constructs in history, art and literature, and the impact of women on and in culture, the minor aspires to promote discussion, critical thinking, close-evaluation of practices and standards, and reflexive examination of self.
 
Required Courses: (6 credits)
WG 110 Introduction to Women’s and Gender Studies
WG 440: Advanced Topics in Women’s and Gender Studies
 
Select one Art & Literature:
FA 218 Fashion History
EN 221 Ethnic American Literature
EN 228 Women in Literature
FA 311 Women in Visual Arts
FD 355 Global Perspectives of Dress in Culture
 
Select one History & Sociology:
FA 218 Fashion History
HG 206 History and Sociology of American Family
HG 223 Women in American History
SB 232 Sociology of Gender
SB 329 Women and Culture
 
Select one Critical Approaches & Theory:
CM 320 Communication in the Mass Media
EN 351 Post-Colonial Literature
CM 440 Advanced Topics in Communication
EN 475 Theoretical Approaches to Literature & Culture
WG 481: Independent Study: Directed Readings in Women's and Gender Studies
 
Select one elective from the following (not already used to satisfy a requirement of the minor)
CM 240 Multicultural Communication
CM 320 Communication in the Mass Media
CM 440 Advanced Topics in Communication
EN 221 Ethnic American Literature
EN 228 Women in Literature
EN 351 Post-Colonial Literature
EN 475 Theoretical Approaches to Literature & Culture
FA 218 Fashion History
FA 311 Women in Visual Arts
FD 355 Global Perspectives of Dress in Culture
HG 206 History and Sociology of American Family
HG 232 Women in American History
HS 133 Community Mental Health and Services
PS 260 Human Sexuality
SB 232 Sociology of Gender
SB 329 Women and Culture
WG 381 Internship in Women’s and Gender Studies
WG 481: Independent Study: Directed Readings in Women's and Gender Studies
 
*Pre-requisites may be required for any of the courses above and must be fulfilled before enrolling in the course of your choosing.

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