Psychology

PS 120 Introduction to Psychology
3 credits (AS)
The focus of this course is on the scientific study of human behavior and mental processes, and how they are affected by environment, experience and physiology. Students are introduced to a variety of psychological terms, concepts and approaches. (Offered fall and spring terms)
 
PS 121 Child Psychology
3 credits (AS)
The focus of this course is on human development from conception through the middle years of childhood. The developmental aspects of the child’s physical, emotional, social, personality, language and cognitive growth are presented. The impact of family, peers, and other environmental influences on the child are also investigated. Prerequisite: PS 120 Introduction to Psychology.
 
PS 122 Adolescent Psychology
3 credits (AS)
This course focuses on the characteristics, needs and problems of adolescence. Biological, cognitive, societal, familial and peer influences on behavior are among the topics covered. Prerequisite: PS 120 Introduction to Psychology.
 
PS 123 Adult Psychology
3 credits (AS)
The developmental process of aging, including family adjustment, marriage, single adults, biological changes, intellectual development, retirement, senescence and death are addressed in this course. The focus is on the bio-physiological and psychosocial forces that affect adult development. Prerequisite: PS 120 Introduction to Psychology.
 
PS 204/304 Positive Psychology
3 credits (AS)
This course provides an in-depth overview of positive psychology. Human resiliency, coping, strengths, resources and wellness are all central to the field of positive psychology, an area of scientific study dedicated to maximizing human potential and well-being. Students are engaged in understanding the conceptual, empirical, and practical aspects of this field of study and its growing contributions to the general field of psychology.  Students cannot receive credit for both PS 204 and PS 304.  The courses run concurrently and PS 304 students complete the same requirements as PS 204 students, with the addition of two 2-3 page research papers.  Prerequisite: PS 120 Introduction to Psychology.
 
PS 225 Lifespan Developmental Psychology
3 credits (AS)
This course reviews development through the entire lifespan. Each developmental stage - from fetal growth, infancy, toddlerhood, childhood, adolescence, young adulthood, middle age, and maturity – will be discussed in terms of cognitive, social, emotional, and physical changes. Theoretical approaches to psychological development are also presented. (Offered spring term) Prerequisite: PS 120 Introduction to Psychology.
 
PS 234 Social Psychology
3 credits (AS)
This course introduces students to the social approach in the discipline of psychology. The course focuses on how the presence of other people influences one’s behavior and mental processes. Topics investigated include: social cognition, social influence and social relations. Students learn basic issues and methodologies prevalent in social psychology. They also evaluate social problems and examine their own beliefs and behaviors from a social psychology perspective. (Offered fall term) Prerequisite: PS 120 Introduction to Psychology or SB 130 Introduction to Sociology.

PS 260/360 Human Sexuality
3 credits (AS)
Human Sexuality is designed to help students better understand sexuality and sexual behavior in themselves and others. Emphasis is on the interrelationship of biology and psychology. The course examines a variety of social issues relevant to sexual attitudes and behaviors.  Students cannot receive credit for both PS 260 and PS 360.  The courses run concurrently and 360 students complete the same requirements as PS 260 students, with the addition of one 5-6 page research paper.

PS 323 Abnormal Psychology
3 credits (AS)
This course is an introduction to the issues associated with defining, understanding, and treating maladaptive behavior. The major schools of thought and systems of classifying abnormal behavior are presented and discussed. Questions relating to diagnosis, treatment and research are raised and societal issues concerning maladaptive behavior are examined. (Offered fall term) Prerequisite: PS 120 Introduction to Psychology.
 
PS 325 Educational Psychology
3 credits (AS)
This course is a study of psychological principles and research as applied to classroom organization, teaching, learning and the various psychological tests used in the school setting. Prerequisite: PS 120 Introduction to Psychology.
 
PS 326 Personality Theories
3 credits (AS)
This course provides an overview of the nature of personality theory as well as comprehensive summaries of specific theories of personality. Works of Freud, Adler, Jung, Horney, Rogers, May, and others are considered. Students examine theories concerning the nature and development of human personality and the factors producing integration or disorientation. The course also examines personality dynamics in relationship to stress, frustration, and conflict. (Offered spring term) Prerequisite: PS 120 Introduction to Psychology.
 
PS 327 Biopsychology
3 credits (AS)
The known universe’s most amazing organ, the brain, is explored in this course; specifically, its role in lower-level functions to sustain basic drives and upper-level functions to enable thinking, speaking, and perceiving is considered. (Offered fall term) Prerequisite: PS 120 Introduction to Psychology.
 
PS 330 Sensation and Perception
3 credits (AS)
How do we see and hear? How does the brain make sense of all the sensory input it gets to produce the rich perceptual world we experience? Through lectures, in-class demonstrations, and discussions, students learn how the anatomy and physiology of the eye and ear (and related parts of the brain) allow us to understand speech, perceive color, see motion and depth, and even recognize faces. Prerequisite: PS 120 Introduction to Psychology.
 
PS 337 Psychology of Emotions
3 credits (AS)
This course presents a range of topics related to the emotional experience including perspectives on categorizing or classifying emotions, biological and physiological approaches to understanding emotions, the development of emotions, individual differences in emotional experience, and the role of emotions in social relationships. Prerequisite: PS 120 Introduction to Psychology.
 
PS 341 Learning
3 credits (AS)
This course is a thorough introduction to the major theories of learning. As well as touching upon the work of Pavlov, Thorndike, Hull, Skinner, Tolman, and others, the course will cover such specific topics as habituation, classical conditioning, instrumental conditioning, stimulus control, aversive control, schedules of reinforcement, choice behavior, learning set, rule learning, place learning, and observational learning. The course will also stress practical applications of these principles (e.g., token economies, systematic desensitization, etc.). Prerequisite: PS 120 Introduction to Psychology.
 
PS 359 Forensic Psychology
3 credits (CS)
This course is an introduction to the science and practice of psychology as applied to the law and the criminal justice system. The major concepts, theories, and research findings in psychology as they relate to a broad range of legal issues, including the function and participants of the legal system, crime and criminal investigation, civil and criminal cases, and ethics, will be examined. (Offered fall term) Prerequisite: PS 120 Introduction to Psychology and PS 323 Abnormal Psychology.
 
PS 364 Cognition
3 credits (AS)
This course is an advanced introduction into the study of mental representations and processes. The topics covered include perception, attention, memory, language, concept formation, and decision-making. The course covers relevant theories and research findings and relates course content to real-world applications. Prerequisite: PS 120 Introduction to Psychology.
 
PS 377 Research Methods: Psychology
3 credits (AS)
This class gives students first-hand experience with empirical data. Students gain knowledge of scientific methodology and gain experience in organizing and interpreting observations from psychological experiments. They also gain experience in writing research reports and APA style. The course includes introductory lectures on experimental design, the performance of several research projects, the analyses of these projects using SPSS, and the preparation of research reports. This course is available to Psychology or Psychology/Criminal Justice Dual Degree students only. (Offered spring term) Prerequisites: PS 120 Introduction to Psychology and SM 261 Statistics.
 
PS 498 History and Systems of Psychology
3 credits (AS)
A comprehensive examination of the history and growth of psychology as an experimental and applied science from the 1850’s to the present. The course examines the development of psychology within the context of the social, cultural, and scientific history of the Western world. (Offered spring term) Prerequisites: PS 120 Introduction to Psychology, PS 326 Personality Theories, and senior standing.

PS 499 Senior Capstone
3 credits (AS)
In the Capstone Seminar students focus on specific academic projects that integrate the knowledge and skills from their previous course work, and prepare them for the next stage of their professional development. The course stresses written, oral, and visual communication; pragmatic problem-solving skills; setting and achieving specific goals; and self-assessment. A major research paper will be written. (Offered fall and spring terms) Prerequisite: PS 377 Research Methods:  Psychology.